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Weekend Opinion Piece in The Wall Street Journal:
“The Questionable Link Between Saturated Fat and Heart Disease”

‘Saturated fat does not cause heart disease’—or so concluded a big study published in March in the journal Annals of Internal Medicine. How could this be? The very cornerstone of dietary advice for generations has been that the saturated fats in butter, cheese and red meat should be avoided because they clog our arteries. For many diet-conscious Americans, it is simply second nature to opt for chicken over sirloin, canola oil over butter.

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Nightline: “Could Saturated Fat Be Good For You?”

Author of a new health book believes the way people think about fat in food is totally wrong. Americans used to eat 3-to-4 times more red meat than they do today.

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CBC’s The Current: ‘Fat Doesn’t Make You Fat’ – Nina Teicholz’s Big Surprise

Ever think our understanding of fat and what’s fattening is off? Today, science journalist Nina Teicholz takes us through what she says is the flawed thinking and the flawed science that has shaped nutrition and public health policies for decades. Get ready for A Big Fat Surprise.

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The Leonard Lopate Show: “Eating Fat Doesn’t Make Us Fat”

For decades, many people have believed that fat, especially saturated fat, makes us gain weight, but that turns out not to be true. Investigative journalist Nina Teicholz documents how the low-fat nutrition advice of the past 60 years has had disastrous consequences for our health.

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Interview on Medscape with Tricia Ward

EXCERPT Editor’s Note: The role of dietary fat, particularly saturated fat, in coronary artery disease (CAD) has been debated. The 2013 American Heart Association/American College of Cardiology Guideline on Lifestyle Management to Reduce Cardiovascular Risk continues to recommend a diet comprising 5%-6% saturated fat. With meta-analyses challenging the notion that saturated fat intake increases CAD risk, perhaps it’s no surprise that among the New York Times best-selling books in 2014 was The Big Fat Surprise: Why Butter, Meat & Cheese Belong in a Healthy Diet. The author, Nina Teicholz, spoke with theheart.org | Medscape Cardiology.

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Weekends with Alex Witt: ”Why You Should Eat Butter”

Alex Witt talks to author Nina Teicholz about her new book, ‘The Big Fat Surprise’, which tells us that foods like butter, milk and cheese are part of a healthy diet.

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The FIVE, Fox News Insider: “Is Everything We Know About Saturated Fat Wrong?”

Is everything we’ve been told about eating fat wrong? A recent study showed that there’s no good evidence that saturated fats found in foods like butter, cheese or red meat causes heart disease. So is it time to end that bacon strike?

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Nina Teicholz at TEDxEast: “The Big Fat Surprise“

Nina Teicholz speaks about her book, The Big Fat Surprise, to a TedEx East audience.

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KQED, FORUM with Michael Krasny: “Can a High-Fat Diet Be Good for You?”

Nina Teicholz speaks with host Mina Kim about the value of a high-fat diet.

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Family Circle: “Fat vs. Fiction: The Truth About Fat in Your Diet”

Investigative journalist Nina Teicholz, author of The Big Fat Surprise, explains how several shocking discoveries led her to radically change her family’s diet.

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Tips on Healthy Living: “We Might Be Replacing Trans Fats With Something Much Worse”

Book Excerpt, Big Fat Surprise Today, vegetable oils such as soybean, corn, safflower, sunflower, or cottonseed oil–or “polyunsaturated fats”–are commonly used to replace trans fats. But when heated to temperatures required for frying food, these highly unstable oils can create oxidation products that are extremely toxic. From The Big Fat Surprise: Why Butter, Meat & Cheese Belong in a Healthy Diet.

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Yahoo! Shine: “Myth: Low-Fat Diets Prevent Cancer”

Book Excerpt, Big Fat Surprise A widely held belief about women’s health-that dietary fat causes cancer, including breast cancer, has turned out not to be supported by scientific evidence. From The Big Fat Surprise: Why Butter, Meat & Cheese Belong in a Healthy Diet.

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The Atlantic: “How We Got Red Meat Wrong”

Investigative journalist Nina Teicholz, author of The Big Fat Surprise, explains how several shocking discoveries led her to radically change her family’s diet.

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Op-Ed on CNN.com: “Our Fear of Fat is Melting”

Eating fat helps heart health and weight loss, concluded a widely reported clinical trial this week. The result did not surprise close followers of nutrition science since it echoed a decade’s worth of similar studies. But, unlike its predecessors, the new trial was not ignored by nutrition experts and the media; that was the real news. It’s a sign that a half-century-long fear of dietary fat might finally be melting away, exactly the breakthrough needed to start healing the nation’s health.

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Op-Ed in The Wall Street Journal: “The Last Anti-Fat Crusaders”

The top scientist guiding the U.S. government’s nutrition recommendations made an admission last month that would surprise most Americans. Low-fat diets, Alice Lichtenstein said, are ”probably not a good idea.”

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Opinion Piece in the New York Times: “The Government’s Bad Diet Advice”

FOR two generations, Americans ate fewer eggs and other animal products because policy makers told them that fat and cholesterol were bad for their health. Now both dogmas have been debunked in quick succession.

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New York Times: “Should We Be Scared of Butter?”

Is butter, along with other sources of saturated fats, back on the table, as many have recently claimed?

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Washington Monthly: “Meat Puppets”

…the Annals of Internal Medicine published a remarkable study on the comparative health benefits of low-fat versus low-carbohydrate diets.

In Print

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Time Magazine: “Ending the War on Fat”

Story lays out the arguments in The Big Fat Surprise – a major coup for changing the conversation about fat and saturated fat.

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“Are Some Diets Mass Murder?”

From low fat to Atkins and beyond, diets that are based on poor nutrition science are a type of global, uncontrolled experiment that may lead to bad outcomes, concludes Richard Smith.

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London Evening Standard: “Eat Fat, Get Thin: The New Diet Rules”

When you join a new gym, you don’t expect to be sent home with a long list of fats to introduce into your diet. Neither is it normal to be given a workout plan that lasts for no longer than 15 minutes. Isn’t that just a warm-up? But that’s exactly what happened to me at The Library, a boutique gym in Notting Hill that specialises in superfast workouts and rapid results. The owner, Zana Morris, was confident I’d shift at least 5lb on her 12-day starter programme, a regime that involved gorging on ribeye steaks, whole avocados and great dollops of cream cheese plus lifting weights so heavy you’re almost sick with exertion.

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The Week: “The Glorious Return of the Egg: Why Uncle Same Is a Horrible Nutritionist.”

Put down that egg-white omelet. Whole eggs aren’t going to give you a heart attack. So says the government now, after 40 years of warning that eggs are killing you, and funding bad research to ‘confirm’ that they do, and employing experts to shout down nutritionists who say they don’t.

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The Kansas City Star: “I Love Red Meat, Rich Foods, and Science Says It’s OK.”

It was our first Sunday-at-sundown, coed gathering of the new year, following a three-week holiday break, and I had been eating appropriately indulgently for some time: juicy chuck roasts, pan-seared T-bones and salted butter troweled on thick slices of homemade bread.

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Elle: “If the Low-Fat Diet Is a Lie, What the Hell Should We Eat?”

For decades the low-fat, high-carb diet was gospel. Now science is singing a very different tune. So what’s a woman to believe?

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Daily Mail, UK: “How butter and cheese can keep you slim – and even ward off diabetes: Saturated fat has long been demonized by doctors, but evidence now suggests it could be healthy.”

Eating fat helps heart health and weight loss, concluded a widely reported clinical trial this week. The result did not surprise close followers of nutrition science since it echoed a decade’s worth of similar studies. But, unlike its predecessors, the new trial was not ignored by nutrition experts and the media; that was the real news. It’s a sign that a half-century-long fear of dietary fat might finally be melting away, exactly the breakthrough needed to start healing the nation’s health.

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Cosmopolitan UK: “Eat More Fat. Yes, I Said It.”

As the fat vs sugar debate rumbles on Nina Teicholz, author of The Big Fat Surprise, explains why doctors have been wrong about our diets all along…

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Times Live: “Noakes Diet Has Devotees by Doctors, Scientists and Dieticians Aren’t So Sure”

Noakes’s guru is US investigative journalist Nina Teicholz. ‘If you haven’t read her book The Big Fat Surprise, you’re clueless’, he says.

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Times of London: “Experts Have Been Feeding Us a Big Fat Myth”

‘A devastating new book…. shows that the low-fat craze was based on flimsy evidence. Nina Teicholz, an experienced journalist who spent eight years tracking down all the evidence for and against the advice to eat low-fat diets, finds that it was based on flimsy evidence, supported by an intolerant consensus backed by vested interests and amplified by a docile press.’

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Star Tribune: “Chocolate Milk in the Schools and Other Products of Expert Opinion”

Right before the end of the school year, it finally occurred to me to ask my fourth-grader if she ever drank chocolate milk at school. It turns out she did every day. Her whole table drinks it, she told me at the time — it’s one big chocolate-milk party over there. She’s a good kid and wants to please her parents, so I told her to please, sweet darling, knock it off. I have my doubts. We try to pack her lunch, but since it’s hard to stock small cartons of the whole milk she ravishes at home, we don’t have a lot of control over what she drinks in the cafeteria during the school year. Those options are squarely in the hands of the USDA.

On TV

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Nightline: “Could Saturated Fat Be Good For You?”

Author of a new health book believes the way people think about fat in food is totally wrong. Americans used to eat 3-to-4 times more red meat than they do today.

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Good Morning America, ABC News: “The Big Fat Surprise Rocks the Health Food World”

The new book that claims a high-fat diet can actually be good for you. The Big Fat Surprise is shaking up everything you’ve been told about eating healthy.

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Fox Business Video: “Saturated Fats Not Bad for Your Health?”

May. 30, 2014 – 3:40 – ‘The Big Fat Surprise’ author Nina Teicholz argues saturated fats are not bad for a person’s health.

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Dr. Sanjay Gupta: “Teicholz: Red meat is not bad for you”

June. 4, 2014 – CNN’s Dr. Sanjay Gupta talks with Nina Teicholz, author of “The Big Fat Surprise.

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Appearance on Varney & Co: “Nestle Says Goodbye to Artificial Flavors”

‘Big Fat Surprise’ author Nina Teicholz weighs in on Nestle’s decision to remove artificial flavors from its candies and healthy eating habits.

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The Cycle, MSNBC: “The Tastiest Advice You’ve Ever Heard”

Author Nina Teicholz talks to The Cycle about the research behind her new book about how saturated fats became the enemy.

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Live with Kelly and Michael: “Kick Start the New Year: Nutrition Edition”

Author of ”The Big Fat Surprise” Nina Teicholz tells Kelly and Michael about what to eat.

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KETV Omaha (ABC 7): “The Big Fat Surprise”

When you think of fat, you probably don’t think ‘healthy,’ but some said saturated fats are good for you in moderation. ‘Fat is not the villain that we thought it once was,’ said Terry Shanahan, who eats high saturated fat. — Scroll Down for Video: Doctor says saturated fat in moderation is OK Nina Teicholz, author of “The Big Fat Surprise: Why Butter, Meat and Cheese Belong in a Healthy Diet.”

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Yahoo TV: “Interview with Bianna Golodryga”

It’s the jolting headline that will make your taste buds jump for joy. Foods high in cholesterol may not be bad for your heart after all. After years of warning consumers to cut down on cholesterol, found in eggs, shellfish, butter and beef, the nutrition community has come full circle. Click the image at right to view the interview.

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Fox and Friends, Fox News Insider: “Author: Americans Have Been Fed Misinformation About Fatty Foods”

If you’ve been steadfastly avoiding that big steak or bacon-and-egg breakfast, we have some good news to share with you. It comes from Nina Teicholz, author of the The Big Fat Surprise: Why Butter, Meat & Cheese Belong in a Healthy Diet. Teicholz explained on Fox and Friends that since the 1950s, Americans have been told that saturated fat is bad and will contribute to heart disease.

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The FIVE, Fox News Insider: “Is Everything We Know About Saturated Fat Wrong?”

A recent study showed that there’s no good evidence that saturated fats found in foods like butter, cheese or red meat causes heart disease. So is it time to end that bacon strike?

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Larry Parks Show: “Larry Parks Interviews Nina Teicholz”

In The Big Fat Surprise, investigative journalist Nina Teicholz reveals the unthinkable: that everything we thought we knew about dietary fat is wrong.

On Radio

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The Leonard Lopate Show: “Eating Fat Doesn’t Make Us Fat”

For decades, nutritionists have advocated a diet low in fat. But investigative journalist Nina Teicholz says that recommendation is based on a single, faulty study.

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KQED, FORUM with Michael Krasny: “Can a High-Fat Diet Be Good for You?”

For decades, nutritionists have advocated a diet low in fat. But investigative journalist Nina Teicholz says that recommendation is based on a single, faulty study.

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CBC’s The Current: “‘Fat Doesn’t Make You Fat’: Nina Teicholz’ Big Surprise”

Ever think our understanding of fat and what’s fattening is off? Today, science journalist Nina Teicholz takes us through what she says is the flawed thinking and the flawed science that has shaped nutrition and public health policies for decades. Get ready for a Big Fat Surprise.

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Wisconsin Public Radio: “Nina Teicholz”

She has written for publications that include Gourmet magazine, The New Yorker, The Economist, The New York Times, and The Washington Post. She is the author of ‘The Big Fat Surprise: Why Butter, Meat & Cheese Belong in a Healthy Diet’.

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Rural Routes: “Interview by Trent Loos”

Oct 2, 2014 Nina Teicholz investigative journalist spent 9 years research fat and protein and determines ‘meat is a health food’.

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Dave Asprey, Bulletproof Radio: “Nina Teicholz on Saturated Fats & the Soft Science on Fat – #149”

Nina Teicholz is an investigative journalist and author of the New York Times Best-Selling Book, The Big Fat Surprise: Why Butter, Meat and Cheese Belong in a Healthy Diet. She is a well-respected food and nutrition writer that has contributed to publications such as the New York Times, the New Yorker, the Economist, and Men’s Health magazines, and is a former NPR reporter and associate director for the Center of Globalization and Sustainable Development at Columbia University.

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Doug Fabrizio, KUER Radio Salt Lake City: “Interview on The Big Fat Surprise“

Since the 1950s, a war has been waged in America against an accused dietary culprit: fat.

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Interview with Amy Alkon, BlogTalk Radio: “Nina Teicholz on Why Butter, Meat, & Cheese are the Foundation of a Healthy Diet”

Amy Alkon’s Advice Goddess Radio: ‘Nerd Your Way To A Better Life!’ with the best brains in science. Saturated fat is your friend. Really. It turns out everything we’ve been told about eating fat is wrong. On tonight’s show, meticulous journalist Nina Teichholz will lay out the scientific errors, bias, and dangerous misrepresentations that have underpinned the dietary dogma of the past 60 years.

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NPR Louisiana Eats: “Personal Eating Choice: A Dietary Debate”

With so much dissenting information over dietary choices, it’s tough to know which regime is right for you.

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Debate with Neal Barnard, WLRN: “Butter, Meat and Cheese and a Healthy Diet”

Thursday’s Topical Currents takes on the issue of dietary fats and whether or not they are actually detrimental to our health.

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Michael Cohen: “Capital City Recap”

Interview with Nina Teicholz – Author of the new book – ‘The Big Fat Surprise: Why Butter, Meat and Cheese Belong in a Healthy Diet’.

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Rush Limbaugh, The Rush Limbaugh Show: “Like Junk Science on the Climate, Saturated-Fat Fearmongering Has Been Exposed as Baseless”

RUSH: How many of you believe that eating eggs and mayonnaise and steak and other high fat foods is a no-no, shouldn’t do it. It’s gonna lead to obesity — fat, if you’re in Rio Linda. It’s gonna lead to cholesterol. It’s gonna lead to clogged arteries. It’s gonna lead to your death, prematurely.

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Interview with Talia Ralph, Heritage Radio: “Episode 184 – The Big Fat Surprise”

‘Fat is the nutrient that’s been targeted the most – and I’ve realized that all of our nutrition recommendations over the past 50 years have turned out to be wrong!’ 03:00 ‘This story of low-fat diets is a failure of scientists – good intentioned men who really wanted to solve the heart disease epidemic, believed this is the best possible solution and jumped the gun before it was ready.’ 11:00

Online

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Bryan Walsh, Time.com, “6 Facts About Saturated Fat That Will Astound You”

It’s nutrition dogma: saturated fat is bad for you. But a new book makes the case that our obsession with low-fat diets has made us sick Julie &Julia Food Movies MORE Movie-able Feast: The 8 Most Delicious Films About Food The Best and Worst Foods for Bloating The Food That Mysteriously Makes You Feel Full, Explained Back in 2000, the journalist Nina Teicholz got a gig reviewing restaurants in New York City for a small paper.

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Nadia Kounang, CNN, “Are Butter, Cheese and Meat That Bad?”

‘To eat, or not to eat?’ For many people these days, that really is the question. For the past four decades, we’ve been told to stay away from red meat, dairy and cheese — foods high in saturated fats — because saturated fat is bad for the heart.

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Todd Wasserman, Mashable, “Go Ahead, Order the Bacon. But Go Light on the Fruit, Author Says”

What if investigative journalist Nina Teicholz told you everything you know about nutrition is wrong? That means all the time you spent avoiding bacon, butter and red meat and eating vegetables instead, you were actually doing your body harm? That’s the counter-intuitive conclusion behind Teicholz’s new book, Big Fat Surprise: Why Butter, Meat and Cheese Belong in a Healthy Diet. Despite the title and subject matter, though, this isn’t a diet book and there’s not a recipe to be found.

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Dr. Hoffman, Intelligent Medicine, “Intelligent Medicine Podcast”

The Big Fat Surprise: Why Butter, Meat and Cheese Belong in a Healthy Diet; Dr. Hoffman interviews Nina Teicholz author of the controversial new book which challenges the low-fat diet dogma.

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Venessa Wong, Bloomberg Businessweek, “Q&A: Why We’re Better Off Eating Plenty of Fat”

Last week science helped us clearly establish that wine may or may not be good for you. You’re welcome. Now, what about fat? In the latest is-it-or-isn’t-it nutrition debate, author and cheese advocate Nina Teicholz says fat has been misunderstood and unfairly vilified. Her new book, The Big Fat Surprise, argues that more fat—including the saturated kind found in meat, dairy, and eggs—leads to better health and weight loss. Bloomberg Businessweek wanted to know how she decided it was all right to give such seemingly indulgent advice.

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Locke Hughes, Shape.com, “Why Eating Like a Man May Be Best for Women’s Health”

Journalist Nina Teicholz wants you to rethink everything you thought you knew about dieting. Her new book, The Big Fat Surprise: Why Butter, Meat & Cheese Belong in a Healthy Diet, sets forth a new way of thinking about fat: What if the very foods we’ve been avoiding—sizzling steaks and creamy, cheesy sauces—were actually key to reversing heart disease, diabetes, and even obesity?

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Daniela Drake, The Daily Beast, “Everything You Know About Fat Is Wrong”

Think a low fat diet is the key to health? Think again. You can’t blame patients for being skeptical. After years of advocating low-fat diets, Dr. Oz recently declared that eating saturated fat might not actually be all that bad. And the month before that, the press hyped a new study that indicated there’s no good evidence that saturated fats cause heart disease. The American Heart Association, on the other hand, continues to promote low-fat diets. So what should physicians tell patients now?

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Samantha Chang, The Examiner, “High-Fat Low-Carb Ketogenic Diet Aids Weight Loss, Curbs Disease: Fat is Healthy”

Saturated fat is not the cause of heart attacks, obesity or diabetes, says investigative journalist Nina Teicholz. According to Teicholz, the real cause of heart disease and weight gain is a high-carb, sugar-rich diet.

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Peter Wilson, American Thinker, “Bacon Is Good for You”

Those who love rib-eye steaks and double-cream Brie will feel better about their guilty pleasures after reading Nina Teicholz’s article in this weekend’s Wall Street Journal, “The Questionable Link Between Saturated Fat and Heart Disease.” She writes, for example: Too much whole-grain oatmeal for breakfast and whole-grain pasta for dinner, with fruit snacks in between, add up to a less healthy diet than one of eggs and bacon, followed by fish.

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Nina Teicholz, MindBodyGreen.com, “7 Foods That Aren’t As Healthy As You Think”

For many years, fats were the bad guy in the health and nutrition world, responsible for obesity, heart disease, and everything in between. But that bad advice has led to decades of misinformation being absorbed by the general public. There’s a long list of foods that many people believe are ‘good for you’ thanks to the anti-fat crusade. Here are seven foods you’ve probably heard are healthy, but shouldn’t be eaten in excess.

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Dr. Michael Eades, ProteinPower.com, “Review of The Big Fat Surprise“

This review of The Big Fat Surprise by Nina Teicholz is the most difficult and demanding I have ever written. It is demanding for a couple of reasons. First, it is psychologically demanding on me because I want to write a review so good it inspires everyone to buy the book immediately and read it. Why? Because I think it is one of the most important books on nutrition ever written. Maybe the most important.

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Review By Adele Hite, MPH RD, Eathropology.com, “Buy This Book”

First of all, Teicholz writes like a dream. I get that parts of Taubes’ book tend to be as readable as an instruction manual for Windows 98 as written by David Foster Wallace. Teicholz has the facility of Michael Pollan, with a sharper intellect, more warmth, and a less condescending attitude. She assumes her audience is smart enough to follow her through the maze of science without wanting to stop to examine every risk ratio ever produced. At the same time, she brings us with her into those difficult moments in an interview when she has to ask a nice person a hard question. And she does ask some tough questions.

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Dr. Frank Lipman, DrFrankLipman.com, “The Big Fat Surprise: A Conversation with Nina Teicholz”

A conversation with investigative journalist, Nina Teicholz, author of The Big Fat Surprise: Why Butter, Meat & Cheese Belong in a Healthy Diet. I love this book for many reasons, the most important being, that in it, Nina reveals the unthinkable: that everything we thought we knew about dietary fats is wrong.

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Ryan Dejonghe, The Avid Reader Blog, “Review: The Big Fat Surprise: Why Butter, Meat and Cheese Belong in a Healthy Diet“

What can I say? I’m blown away by the mpeccable research and fact presentation in this book. At first, I thought this would be a mildly interesting book with some interesting insight. Nope. Nina Teicholz brought out the big guns. She lays out her well substantiated thesis and systematically digs in. She ‘specifically avoided relying upon summary reports which tend to pass along received wisdoms’ and she went ‘back to read all the original studies… in some cases seeking out obscure data’. In other words, she meticulously lays out the evidence, slam dunking the point: fat ain’t bad.

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Mychal Massie, WND Documentary, “Gullible Americans”

A friend forwarded me a Wall Street Journal article on a study published in the March issue of the journal Annals of Internal Medicine pursuant to “the dubious science behind the anti-fat crusade.” The study validated what several of my friends and I have long believed, but, for purposes herein discussed, the sentences that spoke the greatest truth to me read: ‘The new study’s conclusion shouldn’t surprise anyone familiar with modern nutritional science, however. The fact is, there has never been solid evidence for the idea that these fats cause disease. We only believe this to be the case because nutrition policy has been derailed over the half-century by a mixture of personal ambition, bad science, politics and bias.’

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Scott Johnson, PowerLine Blog, “The Big Fat Surprise“

In his capacity as a full service operation, Glenn Reynolds has occasionally cited science writer Gary Taubes and linked to his book Why We Get Fat. Taubes recommends a low-carb/no-carb diet, as some of the popular diet books do, both for reasons of weight control and overall health. Inspired by Taubes, I’ve been following a low carb diet for 18 months. It has worked for me, but I’m not sure how long I can stick with it. Ice cream is my favorite food and I find it difficult to walk through the bakery section of the grocery store without crying.

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John Petrick, NorthJersey.com, “Fat Might Be Our Friend”

Imagine a world where steak is the new Melba toast. Muenster cheese is the new broccoli. Butter keeps the heart and veins nice and lubricated. And all that advice about avoiding whole milk was just plain wrong. After years of low-fat dieting that may work in the short term but only leaves many of us even fatter in the end, could it be: Could fat really be our friend, after all?

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Samantha Chang, Examiner.com, “Low carb high-fat ketogenic-type diets help weight loss, heart disease, diabetes”

Saturated fat is not the cause of weight gain, diabetes or heart disease, according to scientific research touting the benefits of high-fat, low-carb diets such as the ketogenic and Atkins plans. The true cause of obesity, cardiovascular disease, high cholesterol and diabetes is a high-carb diet, especially one high in sugar. That’s what investigative writer Nina Teicholz posits in her book, The Big Fat Surprise.

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Habits interview: Nina Teicholz, The Happiness Project, “I’ve Cultivated the Habit of Hard Work, Which Is Deeply Satisfying.”

Habits interview: Nina Teicholz. I’m hard at work on my book about habits, and it focuses on how to change a habit – whatever you want your habit to …

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Josh Schonwald, Time.com, “Here Are the Only 6 Food Trends You Need to Know for 2015”

Habits interview: Nina Teicholz. I’m hard at work on my book about habits, and it focuses on how to change a habit – whatever you want your habit to …

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Ari Levaux, Salon, “Why everything you think you know about fatty foods might be wrong”

With the salad days of summer behind us, and dark, cold days approaching, fat is in season. The holidays, and the accompanying onslaught of rich feasts, present a timely opportunity to think about fat. I used to assume we ate more fat in winter because our bodies wanted to pack on some extra insulation against the cold, but the evidence in support of this seemingly obvious notion—that dietary fat leads to weight gain—is being challenged.

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Julie Relevant, Fox News Health, “Is butter part of a healthy diet?”

Recent studies and experts agree: butter is back. Yet the news might be a hard one to swallow especially if you nixed it from your diet years ago. So how much butter is beneficial? And is it really better than olive oil? Here, experts weigh in on where butter fits in a healthy diet and how much we should be eating.

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Sue Ontiveros, Thrive Health from the Chicago Sun-Times, “New round of praise for ‘Big Fat Surprise'”

Big Fat Surprise is being touted as one of the must-reads of 2014. The Economist put it on its Page Turners for the year (”eloquent in its argument”). Kirkus chose Teicholz’s book as one of the year’s best (”how the fats in the American diet grew horns and cloven hooves”) and the New York Times best-seller is on the best nonfiction picks of the Wall Street Journal (”Teicholz has a gift for translating complex data into an engaging forensic narrative.”)